More Reviews
REVIEWS Far Cry 4 Review
The open world of Far Cry 4 is wondrous, but is the beauty of Kyrat only skin-deep?

World of Warcraft: Warlords of D Review
Does Blizzard's latest expansion breathe new life into the 10 year-old franchise, or is this MMO finally starting to show its age?
More Previews
PREVIEWS Silence: The Whispered World II Preview
With its absolutely gorgeous sequel, Daedalic aims to create a mid-range difficulty adventure title that will expand the genre to a larger audiences.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES ESCAPE Dead Island
Release date: Out Now

Far Cry 4
Release date: Out Now

Dragon Age: Inquisition
Release date: Out Now

Kingdom Hearts 2.5 HD Remix
Release date: 12/02/14


LATEST FEATURES With Two Paths to Walk This Fall, I Recommend Assassins Play AC Unity Over AC Rogue
For fans of this series, it'll be a decision based on hardware. For enthusiasts, returning to the brand's roots will prove enticing.

Nintendo Download November 2014 - Updating Each Week
If you've got credit on Nintendo's digital eShop service or expect to receive a gift card this holiday season, start making your list with our weekly updates.
MOST POPULAR FEATURES Xbox Downloads October 2014 - Updating Each Week
Microsoft's Xbox One console continues an Xbox Live revolution started over a decade ago. Here's hoping Summer of Arcade makes it to the platform next year.

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP Master_Craig
Welcome Home - PAX AUS 2014
By Master_Craig
Posted on 11/18/14
Last night I returned home from PAX AUS 2014. Long story short, it wasn't perfect, but it was quite possibly the best weekend I've had this year. It was a lot of fun. If you'd like to continue reading, the long story is just below. Buckle up. This is gonna be...

MEMBER BLOG

maca2kx maca2kx's Blog
PROFILE
Why Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes isn't really Metal Gear Solid
Posted on Thursday, April 24 2014 @ 14:17:25 Eastern

This member blog post was promoted to the GameRevolution homepage.
Metal Gear Solid was a watershed moment in gaming for me. The graphics, at the time, were phenomenal; the story was winding and engaging; the gameplay was sharp and not above breaking the fourth wall when appropriate. It’s one of the few titles where the number of times I’ve completed it is close to double digits (I’m not a huge fan of repetition) and I’d be hard pressed to think of any major flaws. So much of what makes the Metal Gear series great appears in every game but a lot of these overarching themes are nowhere to be found in the latest installment, Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes.

The first thing I noticed about Ground Zeroes was obviously the graphics. Metal Gear games have a well-deserved reputation for squeezing ridiculously good graphics out of hardware and Ground Zeroes is no exception. The second thing I noticed was the totally overhauled menu system. Gone are the weapons/items menus brought up by holding L2 or R2; these have been replaced by a severely cut down D-pad selection brought about, no doubt, due to our hero no longer having bottomless pants.



We’re also missing a staple of the series: the codec. This radio has made it into every Metal Gear game I can think of in some form or another and the closest we get now is tapping L1 which will trigger a line or two of advice based on whatever you’re looking at. These changes may make things feel more immediate but Metal Gear was never about immediacy. It’s a series based around 90 minute cut scenes and convoluted plots. Bringing the gameplay in line with modern action games breaks Ground Zeroes into something it should never be: an action game.

Something else I noticed quite quickly was the total absence of cardboard boxes and the almost complete lack of vents. Boxes are a steadfast element in Metal Gear to the extent that there’s a t-shirt for them. I know there’s a t-shirt because I’ve got it and it’s awesome. As for vents, one of the first things you do in the first MGS and the second is crawl through a vent. It’s one of those things that fits perfectly with the scene and feels unmistakably Metal Gear and now, for Ground Zeroes at least, has been whittled down to a couple that can be easily missed.

Speaking of guard responses (check the writing on the t-shirt), another thing which is completely and totally Metal Gear, proclamations like “it’s just a box”, “what was that?”, and “whose footprints are these?” have only one meaning for those of us who have played Metal Gear Solid and that meaning is nostalgia. I didn’t hear much of this during my MGSV: GZ playthrough. Granted, I couldn’t hear a guard say it was just a box because there were no boxes for me to inhabit but I never really heard any guard wonder out loud who footprints belonged to either. I’m not saying that the guards don’t have audio or the ability to question what just happened (in fact, a very nice touch is that they radio HQ before investigating a noise and after concluding it was nothing), I’m just saying it feels like a generic action game which is antithetical to the Metal Gear Solid I know and love.



Of course there are fewer opportunities for a guard to ask “what was that?” or “what was that noise?” because there are fewer ways to lure them to where you want them. The player still has infinite magazines to throw to their heart’s content but for some reason can’t knock on cover. Maybe this is being pedantic but to me this dumbs down a franchise I love. It hurts almost as much as it did when I found out that I couldn’t stand on tiptoes by holding L2 and R2 at the same time.
Standing up a couple more inches or easing up out of the mud while prone wasn’t in the first game but it embodies Kojima's approach to gaming; these are details no other developer gives a crap about but actually serve a purpose. Can a game function without these elements? Of course, hundreds of stealth and action games do just fine without allowing the protagonist to knock or peek higher than his standing height allows but hundreds of games aren’t Metal Gear, and it’s looking like neither is Ground Zeroes.

I think there’s a real cause for worry that Ground Zeroes will be a generic action game dipped in Metal Gear lore. Even locking to cover, a mechanism not specifically distinct to Metal Gear, is gone and replaced with a far more fluid ‘slide’ which can be broken too easily. It feels like The Last Of Us–a fantastic game in its own right–but this fluidity is unsuitable for Ground Zeroes. I found myself far too often sliding out of cover and having to run back. This single mechanism embodies the problems I found in Ground Zeroes, a title inspired by modern games, ill-fitting within the series ethos, but good looking nonetheless.

The opinions expressed here does not necessarily reflect the views of GameRevolution, but it is a blog written by one of our community. This article, posted originally on April 15th, 2014, has been lightly edited for grammar and image inclusion. You can find more Vox Pop articles here. Write a blog by clicking "Add New Entry" on your GR profile page for a chance to be featured on GameRevolution's home page.

[ 0 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
GTA: Online? No... not yet...
Posted on Monday, October 7 2013 @ 10:49:06 Eastern

This member blog post was promoted to the GameRevolution homepage.


I’m back and I’m ready to rant oh so much!!
 
Of course I’m going to talk about the game of the moment: GTA V.
 
The good stuff first: it’s such a ****ing good game. Rockstar truly have excelled with this game. It’s vast, varied, and a wild ride. The single-player story is fun and engaging, the graphics are great (for a GTA game), the world is packed with little touches and easter eggs. And of the previous sentence the most relevant three words are the first three...
 
The Single Player.
 
Where Single Player works like a dream, multiplayer works like a turbo-charged Entity trying to make a high-speed corner. I’ve been trying to get online since the first day it was available. I was fully expecting to not be able to get on there on day one and I was not disappointed. I set up my character using the neat concept of inheriting your grandparents’ genes and then tried to jump in. I didn’t get very far before I fell through the floor, hit the same floor I fell through because games, and was forced to wait until I was presented with the screen that has been bounced around the internet.

That’s fine, I knew success wouldn’t be within reach so early after launch because, let’s face it, it never is. It is hilarious that no publisher ever plans for the launch rush, though. Well, it’s either that we buy games from a bunch of chronic underestimaters or that they don’t want to invest in extra support for the launch period because the demand will soon settle down to something more manageable.

So I waited for day two to roll by and gave it another try. My character hadn’t saved (or the second one that I tried on day one) so I quickly remade him with minimal effort and dived right back in… with an even longer wait and exactly the same outcome. So I went to bed.

Day three was much the same except I was greeted by a different waiting screen and waited so long that my controller turned itself off twice before congratulating my patience with a timeout screen.
It’s day four now and I’ve acknowledged I’ve probably picked up a glitch. Incidentally, that solution doesn’t seem to have worked for me, but it did stop me from getting to the waiting for players screen.
So what does this mean on a wider scale? It’s a bit worrying, really; Rockstar is a huge publisher and they still didn’t manage to release their billion-dollar game without server issues and bugs, and some people were looking forward to Xbox One games forcing 24-hour check-ins!

From the very small portion of online I’ve seen (which basically amounts to the load screens), it seems that Rockstar is gradually adding improvements to the online gameplay. The very fact that the load screen shows information about online modes is evidence of that. I just hope that these improvements actually encompass the first ****ing mission soon too.
 
But the thing that’s really rubbed me the wrong way?

The iFruit app. Oh yes, the bugbear that has dominated comment sections since the game launched has not been lost on me but not because I really can’t wait to train my virtual dog; this has ground my gears because my £40 is effectively worth less than my friend’s £40 because he has an iPhone and I don’t. It’s not about the app; it’s about a huge market being neglected. iFruit might not offer hugely important features but they are features that could have been included in the game, but instead Rockstar chose to make a free app for an external product and then did it badly.

The thing that makes it worse is Rockstar’s frustrating lack of communication. In the comments section on the Rockstar website they almost exclusively respond only when the poster implies that they have accepted money from Apple to make the app exclusive. Besides that, Android users have been given no release date, estimate or otherwise, and not much of an explanation beyond “it’s taking longer than we thought it would," which isn’t particularly convincing seeing as they’ve had five years, so they’re either capable of programming a masterpiece but not an Android app or they didn’t bother with it until it was too late and now they’re focusing on fixing online. And it’s not just the iFruit app; it’s the manual, too. Android users don’t have a manual (unless they get the non-resizable PC version which sometimes doesn’t fit on users’ screens).
 
Rockstar are still awesome, GTA V is still amazing, but if I was forced to say three bad things about them I would have to limit it to two REALLY big ones.

The opinions expressed here does not necessarily reflect the views of Game Revolution, but we believe it's worthy of being featured on our site. This article, posted originally on October 4, 2013 at 4:21 PST, has been lightly edited for grammar and image inclusion. You can find more Vox Pop articles here. ~Ed. Nick Tan

[ 0 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Let's Celebrate The Backpedal! (The Mistake Microsoft Avoided)
Posted on Friday, July 12 2013 @ 12:07:30 Eastern

This member blog post was promoted to the GameRevolution homepage.

The internet has spoken once more and said that we’re not interested in always on games consoles.
 
Wait… did I write that right? Not only has the Microsoft behemoth caved to public opinion but that opinion is that online is bad… expressed almost exclusively online. Hmm, awesome.

So why is it such a big deal that the next generation of consoles not require a constant, or regular, internet connection? After all, who on this planet can’t connect their console to the internet at least once a day? Well, people living in rural areas, people on military bases, people living in many university dorms, people in less developed nations, and of course people who do have decent internet connections that tend to fail at least a few times a year.

The most reliable connection will have periods of downtime; that’s a guarantee. So what does any normal person do when their online source of entertainment goes down for an undisclosed period of time? If you answered anything involving leaving the building and letting the sun’s naked rays hit your exposed skin, then your answer is incomplete. The correct answer is to turn to offline entertainment like books, films, possibly outdoor pursuits, but more likely, single-player games.

But sure, let’s say the people who don’t have a persistent connection can correct that apparently gaping flaw in their otherwise civilised existence. Connections don’t fail every day so for the most part we’ll be able to get on with our single-player entertainment without a problem… maybe. It’s really not just about our personal ability to connect to the internet but also about the physical lines. The internet isn’t an ethereal manifestation with no physical form; it lives thanks to the wires and pipes snaking across the planet and 3% of the internet using population found out how easily their internet lives can be reduced to a crawl in 2008 when a ship’s anchor sliced through a cable off the coast of Egypt. On a less sensational scale we have to worry about rats chewing through cables, lightning striking exchanges, and power cuts at any of the many links in the chain between us and the self-appointed entertainment demigods.

But now the cables are made of Kevlar and they’re lightning-proof and will never be physically damaged. Has there been a game launch in the history of the industry that, despite a need for internet connectivity, went smoothly? I genuinely can’t think of one. The most recent disaster is SimCity which took downtime to a farcical extreme, because EA didn’t think to put some extra servers on to cope with the release of a popular game. This is the scenario that could have awaited not just the launch of every game, but the start of every day when millions of Xbox users have to revalidate their system in case their games had become illegal overnight.

But all of this would have been fine because, according to Don Mattrick, if you don’t have the internet you can use the pioneering offline device: the Xbox 360.

At least their backpedalling didn’t include the spy-in-the-home Kinect. We need something to complain about, after all.

[ 4 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Digital Downloads: Worth It?
Posted on Thursday, January 24 2013 @ 12:28:47 Eastern


The internet’s amazing. Ever since speeds moved into the Mbps range, our interconnectedness has given birth to the digital marketplace. Not everyone has access to the sorts of speeds, bandwidth caps, and storage space for switching...   read more...

[ 14 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Why 'Game Companions' Would Be Totally Bitchin' And Way Better Than Strategy Guides
Posted on Wednesday, December 12 2012 @ 12:57:18 Eastern



A lot of games have strategy guides, usually priced around £10-£20 apiece. These guides are usually A4-sized with a couple of hundred pages detailing advice and step-by-step walkthroughs for the single-player and mult...   read more...

[ 9 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Kickstarter: Revolutionising Game Design?
Posted on Thursday, October 11 2012 @ 12:06:21 Eastern


Kickstarter was launched back in 2009 but has recently hit the spotlight with projects like Ouya—the Android-powered home console—reaching way beyond their requested amount. The idea behind the website is to offer people a wa...   read more...

[ 4 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Special Editions
Posted on Tuesday, September 11 2012 @ 15:10:15 Eastern


There are some *****in’ special editions floating around. Sure, there are some whose only claim to fame is a tin case or an extra code or two, but there are some developers who love their creations enough to extend them into the ph...   read more...

[ 0 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Is Gaming At A Milestone?
Posted on Tuesday, August 21 2012 @ 12:46:43 Eastern


Gaming is the new kid on the block: Films have been around since the 1890s and were based on the long established theatre scene; books are as old as the written word; and music is so ingrained that it is thought that early humans communi...   read more...

[ 12 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Patches, DLC and Downloadable Fixing
Posted on Wednesday, June 27 2012 @ 14:44:57 Eastern


Today marks a fairly monumental occasion in the videogame world. Mass Effect 3 Extended Cut has gone live. Ever since consoles were able to go online, patches have been commonplace, and before that, PC gamers have been enjoying bug fixes...   read more...

[ 4 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
Mass Effect Shall Continue!
Posted on Friday, April 27 2012 @ 14:17:16 Eastern

As I said before, Mass Effect is an incredible universe. ME1, 2 and 3 focused on Shepard’s tale but set the scene for books and graphic novels to complement that story arc and chronicle the stories of other characters such as Anderson, and the ...   read more...

[ 3 Comments ]        [ Post a Comment ]
previous |  1 |  2 |  3 |  4 |  5 |  6 |  7 |  next