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Preparing for the Upcoming Thief
Posted on Friday, January 24 2014 @ 19:39:34 PST

This member blog post was promoted to the GameRevolution homepage.

When a new entry in a franchise comes along, it behooves us to acquaint ourselves with that franchise's past entries. Imagine, if one were alive in 1870, starting to read the serial edition of War & Peace at around chapter 240. About two-thirds of the entire work would be unknown and, given that it's a skillful literary construction aimed at intelligent adults, most of the characters would already be fleshed-out, developed, and significantly transformed by the events of the story. That information would be assumed knowledge on the reader's part and in its absence would have to make do without it.

It's an extreme example (War and Peace has a cast of over five hundred characters, incorporates innumerable references to the Napoleonic Wars, and is in significant part a lengthy refutation of the Great Man theory of history) but it serves to illustrate the basic point all the better for it: one does not start halfway through. With that in mind, let's consider how best to get started for folks who have never played an entry in the Thief series and are looking forward to Eidos Montreal's upcoming effort.

First, the part that costs money:

Thief Collection is $18.99 (US) on Steam. It contains all three of the games released to date and is fully compatible with the lovely fan patches to be discussed below.

Another option is Purchased together they are three cents cheaper than the Steam release and come with feelies such as wallpapers, soundtracks (all three games had great music) and digital copies of the manuals. I'm kicking myself for not getting the GoG version, to be honest.

Second, the part that costs no money:

The Thief community, while perhaps not the most inviting, and with some very rigid orthodoxies about game design, are still a very productive one and that includes something everyone can appreciate - community patches which fix old problems left unresolved by the developer/publisher and new ones which crop up as software and hardware change over time.

For Thief and Thief II (and System Shock 2) there is the semi-official Dark Engine patch.

It's incorporated into the releases but there's also a community patch to fix other problems available for Thief Gold here.

And For Thief II here.

For Deadly Shadows there is the Sneaky Upgrade.  Go here to get it.

Follow all the instructions at the links and you will have all three games up and running on modern software with full widescreen support.

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