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The Wii U’s Lack Of DLC Support Has Me Worried

Posted on Thursday, December 6 @ 15:31:50 Eastern by Jonathan_Leack

Before the Wii U came out last month things were looking good for Nintendo, maybe even too good. Nintendo promised to appeal to casual and core gamers alike and even set up a model for developers to publish games on the eShop at no cost. Both were bold moves, but the issue with DLC support still remains.

Call of Duty: Black Ops II is a prime example of Nintendo’s failure to be aggressive in the hardcore market, or quite frankly even care. Nuketown 2025 is the most played map on every other platform because of its intense, high-reward structure. However, the map isn’t available to Wii U players, and that isn’t going to change. Made worse, it's an important glimpse at the bigger picture, because the map packs that do such a great job of keeping online communities alive are also skipping over Wii U and going straight to the other platforms.

The same can be said for Mass Effect III which has already had two major DLC packages ship on other platforms, with another currently in development. However, EA has no plans to bring any of the three to Nintendo's latest console.

Nintendo has been known for marching to the beat of its own drum, and truthfully the strategy has worked for years now. However, the market in 2012 isn’t what it was five years ago. Releasing a motion-controller based console would be a disaster waiting to happen, and ignoring industry standards is equally as risky. Completely ignoring platform-wide achievements is one thing, but DLC is as commonplace as it is lucrative.

The Wii U is supposed to appeal to both core and casual gamers, but it seems that Nintendo won’t be able to cater to both without compromise. From a financial standpoint it might make sense (keyword: might), but from a gamer perspective it’s facepalm material. Sure, a few years ago we were all raging at the growing prevalence of DLC, but it’s become a good thing in many cases. It’s a reason to keep playing the games we enjoy most. It's an incentive to go back and play games like Mass Effect III long after we've completed them.

Nintendo isn’t exactly known for failure, so I don't expect it to always be this way. However, the question is a matter of when. When will Nintendo finally catch-up to last-gen standards? Until then, I’ll think twice about purchasing third-party games for my new "next-gen" console.
Tags:   Wii U, Nintendo, DLC
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