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Ubisoft Caught Pirating

Posted on Monday, July 21 @ 18:36:32 Eastern by Duke_Ferris
In an amusing turn of events, Ubisoft got caught pirating code for a fix to Rainbow Six Vegas 2... from a pirate. They've pulled the patch from their site now, but too late for me not to make fun of them.

It seems the people who bought R6V2 through Direct-2-Drive got shafted by the most recent patch and were unable to install it. It wanted an original disc, but of course they had none.

So (and this part is speculation) some support guy at Ubi thought to himself "Hrmmm... if they had a pirate no-cd crack for the game, the patch should install.". Lo and behold, it worked, and the pirate's crack ended up as a download from the official Ubi site. (Possibly in violation of their own EULA.)

You can see in the hex code where the pirate left his sig.

I feel a little bad for Ubisoft, actually, because it was, in fact, the fastest way to get people's games fixed. I wonder, however, if they actually knew of everything that might have been in the compiled file. It's probably safe, but the source was obviously dubious.

Should the pirate have been paid for his work? Is a quasi-legal bit of code copyrightable? I hope he sues so we all find out. He won't (obviously) but it would make for a fascinating case.

In other news, returning to the convention center in Los Angeles (where you would have barely known the show was there) really emphasized how insular E3 has become. A lot of people are proclaiming the "death" of the show. I will have much to say about that soon.
 
 


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