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FEATURED VOXPOP Ivory_Soul
Windows 10 Review for Dummies
By Ivory_Soul
Posted on 08/11/15
After all these years, and growing up with Windows 3.1, I have seen an entire evolution of computers and software. Touch screens and large resolutions were a pipe dream just 15 years ago. Now it's the norm. Going from a Packard Bell (yes, before HP) that couldn't run 3D Ultra Mini...

DAILY MANIFESTO

Video Games Build Better Brains

Posted on Monday, November 1 @ 08:17:24 PST by
Food for thought: Feeding your brain with video games may lead to better decision making.

Gamers, for the most part, like to think of themselves as an elite bunch. So much so, we've developed our own language: LEET Speak. But does all the pwning of nooblets help train our brain to function better?

According to two new studies, the answer is: DAMN RIGHT!

The Centre for Vision Research at York University in Toronto conducted a study of men in their 20's consisting of some who played video games for at least 4 hours per week, and some who didn't play video games at all (poor bastards). The study found that the non-gamers primarily used their parietal cortex, the part of the brain that's responsible for hand-eye coordination, while the gamers used their prefrontal cortex, which is involved with higher-level decision making.

Another study conducted by the University of Rochester in New York found that the fast-paced action in many video games resulted in faster decision making..

Both of these studies suggest that video games can greatly improve your brain's neural network, leading to (you guessed it) better, faster decision making. Researchers hope to use the data collected to battle neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, among other applications that an increased brain activity may benefit.
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