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FEATURED VOXPOP whytenoiz ~~        When I was eleven years old, it was a very good year, and I can remember my daily routine vividly. These were the years before I owned a Sony Playstation, and I used to venture to my friends house - everyday after school - to watch him play through Final...

DAILY MANIFESTO

Video Games, Rock.

Posted on Monday, June 26 @ 15:01:47 Eastern by Joe_Dodson
A teenager in Socorro, New Mexico recently came up with an inventive answer to the age-old question, "What to do with all this darned rock cocaine?" According to this article in the strangely named El Defensor Chieftan (The Chief of Defensors?), sixteen year-old Andrew Silva was caught exchanging one kind of crack for another, trading rocks of cocaine for stolen video games and home electronics.

While it is commonly suspected among politicians, mothers, and insane lawyers that video games lead to crime, this is some of the first evidence that crime actually leads to video games.

The boy was caught when his two suppliers, uh, cracked under police pressure. According to the article, Yolanda Ramirez and Geneva Escarsega were easy to find due to their tendency to panhandle at houses before robbing them. When police arrived at the young man's house they found all the stolen electronic equipment and 52 crack rocks. Once nabbed, the article says Ramirez "told police she had traded the items for five rocks of cocaine from Andrew Silva, 16, of Socorro."

Considering the relatively small amount of crack exchanged, we have reason to believe the stolen console was a Nintendo Gamecube.



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