More Reviews
REVIEWS The Weaponographist Review
Sometimes it's a relief to escape the complexity of modern games and fire up a simplistic title that even a zombie could play. Read on to find out if this roguelike is worthwhile.

Slow Down, Bull Review
Insomniac's first venture onto the PC is not what I was expecting.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES Farming Simulator 15
Release date: Out Now

LEGO Jurassic World
Release date: 06/01/15


LATEST FEATURES Hacking the Future: A Watch Dogs 2 Wish List
This inevitable sequel has a lot of potential.

Hex Is Like Magic: The Gathering, Only Better
Hex, it's Magic-ally delicious.

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP UrbanMasque
The Joys of RPing
By UrbanMasque
Posted on 04/24/15
As some of you probably know I work with Corsair to help cover their gaming product launches and create content around their gaming-event based video coverage. Recently, I was asked by Corsair to participate in one of their Throwback Thursday Gaming Videos which basically interviews current...

DAILY MANIFESTO

Video Games, Rock.

Posted on Monday, June 26 @ 15:01:47 Eastern by Joe_Dodson
A teenager in Socorro, New Mexico recently came up with an inventive answer to the age-old question, "What to do with all this darned rock cocaine?" According to this article in the strangely named El Defensor Chieftan (The Chief of Defensors?), sixteen year-old Andrew Silva was caught exchanging one kind of crack for another, trading rocks of cocaine for stolen video games and home electronics.

While it is commonly suspected among politicians, mothers, and insane lawyers that video games lead to crime, this is some of the first evidence that crime actually leads to video games.

The boy was caught when his two suppliers, uh, cracked under police pressure. According to the article, Yolanda Ramirez and Geneva Escarsega were easy to find due to their tendency to panhandle at houses before robbing them. When police arrived at the young man's house they found all the stolen electronic equipment and 52 crack rocks. Once nabbed, the article says Ramirez "told police she had traded the items for five rocks of cocaine from Andrew Silva, 16, of Socorro."

Considering the relatively small amount of crack exchanged, we have reason to believe the stolen console was a Nintendo Gamecube.



comments powered by Disqus

More On GameRevolution