More Reviews
REVIEWS Journey (PS4) Review
The critically acclaimed Journey makes the leap to the PS4. Is the PS3 classic still a trek worth taking? Duh.

Rare Replay Review
Rare has had a profound impact on the gaming industry, and this collection is a catalog of its timeless designs.
More Previews
PREVIEWS Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Preview
Fans were mad about Beyond Earth. Rising Tide should fix that.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES Goat Simulator
Release date: 08/11/15

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain
Release date: 09/01/15

NHL 16
Release date: 09/01/15


LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP oblivion437 Update: I was unfortunately not aware of Shamus Young's severe criticism of Fallout 3 available here to link in the original piece and I regret that.  It dovetails rather nicely with what I've written and it's much better executed than my piece.  I strongly recommend anyone...

DAILY MANIFESTO

Video Games, Rock.

Posted on Monday, June 26 @ 15:01:47 PST by Joe_Dodson
A teenager in Socorro, New Mexico recently came up with an inventive answer to the age-old question, "What to do with all this darned rock cocaine?" According to this article in the strangely named El Defensor Chieftan (The Chief of Defensors?), sixteen year-old Andrew Silva was caught exchanging one kind of crack for another, trading rocks of cocaine for stolen video games and home electronics.

While it is commonly suspected among politicians, mothers, and insane lawyers that video games lead to crime, this is some of the first evidence that crime actually leads to video games.

The boy was caught when his two suppliers, uh, cracked under police pressure. According to the article, Yolanda Ramirez and Geneva Escarsega were easy to find due to their tendency to panhandle at houses before robbing them. When police arrived at the young man's house they found all the stolen electronic equipment and 52 crack rocks. Once nabbed, the article says Ramirez "told police she had traded the items for five rocks of cocaine from Andrew Silva, 16, of Socorro."

Considering the relatively small amount of crack exchanged, we have reason to believe the stolen console was a Nintendo Gamecube.



comments powered by Disqus

More On GameRevolution