More Reviews
REVIEWS Atelier Ayesha Plus: The Alchemi Review
Atelier Ayesha Plus is a new entry in a classic-JRPG series with a pretty paintjob, but does the classic formula still hold up?

Dying Light Review
Developer Techland addresses zombies again in a new light.
More Previews
PREVIEWS The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Ma Preview
I wish I could claim some mastery over this topsy-turvy classic starring elf boy who saves princess. Predictable, right?
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES RUGBY 15
Release date: 02/01/15

DEAD OR ALIVE 5 Last Round
Release date: 02/17/15

Dragon Ball XENOVERSE
Release date: 02/24/15


LATEST FEATURES Kingston HyperX Cloud II Headset Review
Kingston's HyperX Cloud II is a mid-range USB Headset with an onboard sound board. So how does it sound compared to the pros?

Developer Spotlight: Kojima Productions
As we barrel toward this year's Game Developers Conference, the GR crew takes a look at some of the most talented devs in the industry.
MOST POPULAR FEATURES PlayStation Downloads January & February 2015 - Monopoly, January's Free PS+ Games
Have you been playing online with your PlayStation devices? Make sure to get these free games for the month of January in our weekly update feature.

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP oblivion437
Finally Broke My Crowdfunding Rule
By oblivion437
Posted on 01/12/15
I've had a long-standing rule to avoid getting involved in any sort of crowdfunded activities.  I didn't donate to Shadowrun or Wasteland, but I did buy and enjoy both of them (I'm plugging both of those games right now, just so you know they're good).  I haven't...

DAILY MANIFESTO

What Happens To Old Game Developers?

Posted on Wednesday, March 2 @ 05:34:25 Eastern by


The smartass answer would be "They die." Of course, that would just be a mean post. Not that I'm entirely against that.

But the question of graceful aging is strangely unasked in a world dominated by the young. The majority of game developers are between 24 and 35, but what will that look like in 20 years? Every now and then, I think about whether I will be a games journalist/critic/what-do-I-do-exactly when the my 4DHDTV setup needs to be dusted and rearranged to make room for the PS6. Will I have retired by then to pursue more old-timer hobbies like fishing, classical music acoustics, or sunbathing in places I'm not supposed to?

Eddy Boxerman (or who I think was him since they jumbled up the order of presenters), an independent game developer who was turning 40, posed this question to the audience during a series of rapid-fire indie talks at GDC. (He gave the only talk that I found stimulating.) For game developers, I can already see Miyamoto-san and Will Wright and a few others as today's sagacious game dev masters who will continue to fulfill this role in the years to come. But what about the thousands of other game developers? Does reaching old age mean being a failure?

Other artforms like poetry, painting, or classical/jazz musicians favor the old (and sometimes the dead). But other artforms like hip-hop and graffiti favor the young. Which do video games follow? Is it genre-specific? Would it be still be awesome if Cliffy B came out on stage with a chainsaw laser gun when he's 56 or would it just be, err, inappropriate? As opposed to, say, Tim Schafer doing the same thing? I don't know.

I suspect that gaming's technical fields will remain dominated by the young, because technology becomes obsolete quickly, but in twenty years, I hope that the video game industry will have matured by then. And that we start making games for everyone, and not just for the 18-35 male demographic. Surely, playing those kinds of games will keep us young at heart, but it might also become uninteresting.

Either way, I don't think video games will ever leave my side. More than just a passion, it's my way of life. And I'll take that to my grave, whenever that may be.
Tags:   GDC
FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER. YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO.


comments powered by Disqus