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GAMING NEWS

Anonymous Has More to Say to Sony

Posted on Monday, May 9 @ 10:14:03 Eastern by Blake_Morse

It's no secret that "hacker" group Anonymous has been getting a lot of attention not only from the gaming press, but also the general press and, of course, Sony.  But now Sony seems to have once again pushed the wrong button with the faceless legion as they're getting quite upset about the Japanese tech company bringing up their name in various press release and statements to the government.

So now Anonymous has sent out a press release of their own entitled "Sony, I am Disappoint" which pretty much claims that anyone claiming to be associated with them is probably totally full of it and takes a harsh stance against a recent article published about the whole debacle in the Financial Times. Here are a few choice excerpts from the release:

Yesterday, an article appeared in Financial Times, alleging Anonymous' involvement in the data and identity theft of some hundred million users of Sony's Playstation Network and Sony Online Entertainment. This crime is now being investigated by the Homeland Security Agency (HSA), the Department of Justice (DOJ), and other legal entities.

Once again Anonymous has been blamed for a security breach, this time by the journalist Joseph Menn, in his article "Hackers point finger over Sony incursion". Here, Anonymous wishes to lay out our case against these allegations and false assumptions:

First, let us consider a different article by Menn published on the Financial Times website and entitled "Hackers Warned of Arrest". This poor piece of journalism has already been extensively referenced in the Sony matter and is being used by many people who oppose Anonymous as proof of guilt. The only quoted source used by Menn was the now infamous Aaron Barr, former CEO of the humiliated HBGary. Barr made the claim that a chat room called #anonymous, founded by the identity "Q", was irrefutable proof that this "Q" began the movement known as Anonymous. Confident in his assertion, he attempted to sell this and other pieces of so-called "intelligence" about the nature of Anonymous to the U.S. FBI.

His information, however, was incorrect. It would be considered common knowledge that Anonymous began as a "meme", or shared belief, at the turn of the century and later developed to become a "global collective conscience" in 2006. But it was not until 2008 that Anonymous became a true display of "power in numbers". Organised protests against the "Church" of Scientology were staged in over 140 cities around the world, forever associating the Guy Fawkes mask and the right to protest with the movement.

Second, just like Anonymous, John Doe and Joe Bloggs are placeholders, rather than proper names, and are available for free use without repercussions. However because of this, there is no membership to Anonymous and anyone can claim to be a "member". It could be said that "Anonymous is anonymous to Anonymous".

...in the primary article, Menn claims that a "member" of Anonymous, Kayla, made comments as an apparent admission of guilt from the "leaders". Kayla reportedly said, "If you say you are Anonymous, and do something as Anonymous, then Anonymous did it". This statement is inherently weak; an equivalent statement would be that "I confess to being human. Humans performed the attack".

...In order to process credit cards, every company needs to be PCI compliant. "If you are a merchant that accepts payment cards, you are required to be compliant with the PCI Data Security Standard". Since Sony's network was "unpatched and had no firewall installed", that is a clear violation of the PCI standards and ongoing reviews, thus likely to be criminal negligence [see Further Reading]. More importantly, "I can't think of a major data breach where the company was PCI compliant," said Ira Rothken, the lead attorney handling the class action lawsuit.
    
    Sony has been accused of false billing, especially in the repairs department: customers who provided credit card details for an MMORPG are charged $150 for repairs to PS3s that they don't own; repairs are double billed and then referred to retailers; equipment is charged $150 multiple times for repairs that aren't performed.

...Outraged about the blatant coverup and shameful misdeeds, other internet hacker groups will apparently proceed with attacks [9] over Sony's mishandling of the matter. These reactions prove that requesting legislation to cover up corporate crimes and the abuse of law is frowned upon by all online communities, not just the Legion of Anonymous. Apparently Sony will have to learn the hard way that corporate malfeasance will not go unpunished. When the dust settles Sony may have more to fear from a massive class action lawsuit by their user base than the brief actions of the Global Hacker Nerd Brigade, Anonymous...

So, basically what they're saying is, because anyone can claim to be a member, there's no way of proving who did what and the real criminal here is Sony and if anything happens to them there will be more attacks. But of course that's all Sony fault and people that choose to continue to support them and their products deserve to be messed with for being evil and greedy. Yeah, that totally makes sense.

But how are they going to claim to be an unorganized, unrelated group when they're putting "Anonymous Holdings LLC (Bermuda)" at the top of press releases?

It seems now that the Dept. of Homeland Security and FBI are involved, Anon is starting to feel a little heat and get a bit nervous and they're trying to put a PR spin on things. All I know is that I'm relieved I don't have to be going through the crap all you PS3 owners are dealing with right now.

[Source]
Tags:   psn


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