More Reviews
REVIEWS Dokuro (PC) Review
Dokuro makes the jump from handheld to PC, but does it help or hinder this unusual platformer?

About Love, Hate, and the other Review
Simple feelings. Complex puzzles.
More Previews
PREVIEWS Evolve Preview
With multiplayer action set as its focus, Evolve surprised us earlier this month by introducing a single-player campaign mode where you can switch between mercenaries.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES Persona 5
Release date: 12/31/14

Motorcycle Club
Release date: 01/01/15

Atelier Ayesha Plus: The Alchemist of Dusk
Release date: 01/14/15

Saints Row: Gat out of Hell
Release date: 01/20/15


LATEST FEATURES Sony, The Interview, and Why Gamers Should Be Paying Attention
The fallout from the movie's cancellation reaches far wider than just Hollywood.

Downloadable Content Walks the Line Between Fun and Frenzied in Middle-earth
I don’t even care all that much for the Lords of the Rings brand, which makes the content falling under Shadow of Mordor’s Season Pass a pleasant surprise.
MOST POPULAR FEATURES Black Friday 2014 Video Game Deals Buyer's Guide
Looking to score the most bang for your buck the day after Thanksgiving? Well look no further! Our Black Friday guide is just the tool you need.

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP ryanbates
Gamer Love
By ryanbates
Posted on 12/19/14
When a player one meets his or her player two, it's a beautiful thing. Check out this cake my friend and GameRevolution reader Lindsey L. gave her sweetums on their two-year anniversary!   ...

GAMING NEWS

ECA: SOPA/Protect IP Bill Is "The Worst Legislation We've Ever Seen"

Posted on Friday, November 18 @ 06:50:23 Eastern by


The Entertainment Consumers Association is not mincing words. Straight on their website, they declare three pieces of legislation collectively known as Stop Online Piracy Act or SOPA (H.R. 3261) and Protect IP (S. 968 and S.978) as "the worst legislation we've ever seen". It warns that everyday users could be thrown in jail for merely putting up a speedrun or a remixed song:
  • It strips current laws by now making internet companies, which used to be immune, liable for their users’ communications.  This means that Facebook, Youtube, Wordpress, Google and more are now on the hook for what you post.

  • It gives the US Attorney General, with court order, the power to seize websites that possibly infringe or partially infringe copyright.  There would be no due process and no chance to defend yourself before the seizure.  The mere accusation can get a website taken away.

  • It violates Net Neutrality by ordering internet providers, advertising companies and payment systems to block accused websites with technology that just doesn’t exist.

  • It threatens users by imposing fines or jail time for posting even derivatives of copywrited work(s).  A video of your karaoke, playing the piano, video game speed trial would now all be punishable if a copyright holder decides to enforce it.
I have held back my comments on SOPA and Protect IP for several days just so I can peruse the literature. The reported purpose of this trio of bills is to protect American jobs and copyrighted content from target "rogue" foreign websites that infringe on those copyrights. Even Sony and Nintendo of America have voiced their support of the bill along with other numerous media companies. These are noble goals for any bill, but solely based on how it's written, it's much too broad and vague, to the point that it harms the Internet, the future of technology, and ultimately American jobs and the American people.

Under the current Digital Millennium Copyright Act, any claim of copyright infringement must first be sent to the Internet service provider or host and, unless the infringer sends a counter-notice stating why there are not infringing, the infringing material must be taken down. It's not a perfect system by any means, but it's at least some form of due process where you are presumed innocent before being proved guilty.

However, under SOPA/Protect IP, there's hardly any provisions stating that the material needs to be put back up following a counter notice, and a court order could have payment processors and ad networks cut off their service to a site before they've had a chance to defend themselves.

Sites like Justin.tv, YouTube, Facebook, and Google+ (and Game Revolution, I reckon) would also be responsible for every piece of content that goes up on their site just so that they aren't held liable for the worst of the worst users. Venture capitalists also find the wording in the bill, "denying US capital to notorious foreign infringers", much too vague. This would cause unnecessarily draconian enforcement and dismantle the entirety of the global DNS structure. In addition, it also creates an Internet government-sanctioned blacklist that can be too easily abused by Internet Service Providers that find a competitor's site to be infringing.

Worse yet, it would undo much of our victory in Brown vs. EMA earlier this year, in which video games were deemed protected speech.

FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER. YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO.


More from the Game Revolution Network




comments powered by Disqus