More Reviews
REVIEWS Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping S Review
Mario vs. Donkey King: Tipping Stars is the newest Nintendo puzzler that wants to be played for a long, long time to come.

Resident Evil Revelations 2 -- E Review
In this second chapter we see the "survival" part of "survival horror" come charging into the forefront.
More Previews
PREVIEWS Amplitude (2015) Preview
The music-blasting cult classic returns in glorious HD.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES Screamride
Release date: Out Now

Helldivers
Release date: Out Now

BLADESTORM: Nightmare (working title)
Release date: 03/17/15

Stealth Inc 2: A Game of Clones
Release date: 04/01/15


LATEST FEATURES Don't Miss These Smaller Games at PAX East 2015
PAX East always features smaller projects that are no less exciting, and this year's lineup looks to continue the trend.

15 Criminally Underappreciated Titles in the PS2 Library
The PlayStation 2 turns 15 today! Better get off the road, everyone, because someone's getting a driving permit!

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP oblivion437
A Means to Disseminate Honest-to-God Leaks
By oblivion437
Posted on 02/02/15
Wikileaks, though technically not a wiki, provides an easy means to disseminate information that some find it desirable to share against the wishes of those who find it desirable to keep secret. Aside from the morality of the leaking itself, such a service provides a look into the activities of...

GAMING NEWS

If Players Like Female Characters in Hyrule Warriors, Link Might Be a Girl

Posted on Wednesday, June 18 @ 11:30:00 Eastern by


Nintendo revealed the next-generation look of a brand new The Legend of Zelda game at E3 during the company's streaming presentation and while many were confused as to whether the hero of the trailer represented a male or a female Link, franchise head Eiji Aonuma, responsible for many recent Zelda games, seems to suggest it's up to fans.

Kotaku spoke with Aonuma and two producers on Hyrule Warriors at E3. When pressed to better define The Legend of Zelda's responsibility to include female gamers by offering a female hero to play as, Aonuma pointed to Hyrule Warriors as a test for that kind of option in a mainline Legend of Zelda game, namely the one coming to Wii U in the next few years.

Kotaku Editor Jason Schreier: Mr. Aonuma, have you ever thought about that, and whether it'd be more inclusive to female players if they could play as someone of their own gender?

Zelda Franchise Producer Eiji Aonuma: Is it that simple—that creating a female character means bringing more female users into the world?

Schreier: I guess what I mean is, when I'm playing and I see a man—in response to what you said about Link being a representation for the player, and the player being the main character—when a man is playing, he can feel more represented by the player character than a woman playing might.

Aonuma: So there are actually many female characters you can play as in Hyrule Warriors. We've introduced Midna, we've introduced Princess Zelda, and Impa as well. So if that connection needs to be there—I'm not saying that it does—let's see what happens with Hyrule Warriors, if as a result of there being more female protagonists, more women pick up the game, I'm all for it, so I've decided to see what happens with this title.

What do you think? I'd have no trouble accepting a female hero as a lead in a Zelda game. I think it would be a daring change for Nintendo to make, but the creators and developers who've developed this beloved franchise for decades seem to know what they're doing and we've never been able to choose the character in a mainline Zelda game before.

What sense does it make to change what's become a staple of the franchise for so long? It's like asking Princess Peach to strap on some overalls and here, take this plunger, it's your turn. That doesn't make sense, but adding Peach as a playable platforming hero did in the more recent Mario games.

I'm excited to play as different characters in Hyrule Warriors, but I can't say I'd like the option of choosing my hero's gender in an epic adventure series like The Legend of Zelda. To Aonuma's point, I don't think the Zelda franchise struggles to reach female gamers even though the company has come under fire lately from the LGBTQ community.

[Kotaku]
FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER. YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO.


More from the Game Revolution Network




comments powered by Disqus

More On GameRevolution