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FEATURED VOXPOP oblivion437     In all the talk of graphical downgrades no one seems much preoccupied with 'why?'.  Why build something and then proceed to tear it down, piece by piece, in the hope that ever more diminished expectations about the final product won't be severe enough to...

GAMING NEWS

Ubisoft Doing Away With DRM Policy, All Rivers Now Run With Essence Of Fairies

Posted on Wednesday, September 5 @ 14:21:51 Eastern by sara_gunn


If there’s anything that makes me feel like I don’t actually own a game I paid for, it’s digital rights management (DRM) policies. You know, you paid for a legal copy of Assassin’s Creed: Revelations, but you can’t play it unless you’re connected to the Internet because piracy is, apparently, a hell-worthy trespass. So if you’re on the bus or something, you can’t play that game that actually belongs to you. We’re all seeing the problem here, yes?
 
So Ubisoft, in a shocking turn of events, has announced they’re dumping their DRM policy in favor of a one-time-only registration connection. Like how it used to be before everyone got all paranoid. According to Joystiq:

The policy dictated that those playing Ubisoft's PC games would have to maintain a constant connection to the internet, even when playing single-player content. According to Perotti, Ubisoft PC games will now require "a one-time online activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline."
 
It’s nice to know publishers trust us again, though I wouldn’t be surprised if this was temporary. Hopefully, a little trust will go a long way, especially considering that absurd "93-95 percent piracy rate” Ubisoft likes to claim.


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