More Reviews
REVIEWS Animal Crossing: amiibo Festival Review
Amiibo Crossing is (not very much) fun for the whole family!

Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash Review
[Update] Mario’s latest tennis game can be a multiplayer blast, but the single player experience is pretty shallow.
More Previews
PREVIEWS Stellaris Preview
Paradox Interactive turns their lends from history to space, with their 4X/grand strategy hybrid.
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES MOP: Operation Cleanup
Release date: 12/01/15

JoJo no Kimyou na Bouken Eyes of Heaven
Release date: 12/17/15

Read More Member Blogs
Windows 10 Review for Dummies
By Ivory_Soul
Posted on 08/11/15
After all these years, and growing up with Windows 3.1, I have seen an entire evolution of computers and software. Touch screens and large resolutions were a pipe dream just 15 years ago. Now it's the norm. Going from a Packard Bell (yes, before HP) that couldn't run 3D Ultra Mini...


Ubisoft Doing Away With DRM Policy, All Rivers Now Run With Essence Of Fairies

Posted on Wednesday, September 5 @ 14:21:51 PST by sara_gunn

If there’s anything that makes me feel like I don’t actually own a game I paid for, it’s digital rights management (DRM) policies. You know, you paid for a legal copy of Assassin’s Creed: Revelations, but you can’t play it unless you’re connected to the Internet because piracy is, apparently, a hell-worthy trespass. So if you’re on the bus or something, you can’t play that game that actually belongs to you. We’re all seeing the problem here, yes?
So Ubisoft, in a shocking turn of events, has announced they’re dumping their DRM policy in favor of a one-time-only registration connection. Like how it used to be before everyone got all paranoid. According to Joystiq:

The policy dictated that those playing Ubisoft's PC games would have to maintain a constant connection to the internet, even when playing single-player content. According to Perotti, Ubisoft PC games will now require "a one-time online activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline."
It’s nice to know publishers trust us again, though I wouldn’t be surprised if this was temporary. Hopefully, a little trust will go a long way, especially considering that absurd "93-95 percent piracy rate” Ubisoft likes to claim.

More from the Game Revolution Network

comments powered by Disqus

More On GameRevolution