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FEATURED VOXPOP Ivory_Soul
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GAMING NEWS

Ubisoft Doing Away With DRM Policy, All Rivers Now Run With Essence Of Fairies

Posted on Wednesday, September 5 @ 14:21:51 PST by sara_gunn


If there’s anything that makes me feel like I don’t actually own a game I paid for, it’s digital rights management (DRM) policies. You know, you paid for a legal copy of Assassin’s Creed: Revelations, but you can’t play it unless you’re connected to the Internet because piracy is, apparently, a hell-worthy trespass. So if you’re on the bus or something, you can’t play that game that actually belongs to you. We’re all seeing the problem here, yes?
 
So Ubisoft, in a shocking turn of events, has announced they’re dumping their DRM policy in favor of a one-time-only registration connection. Like how it used to be before everyone got all paranoid. According to Joystiq:

The policy dictated that those playing Ubisoft's PC games would have to maintain a constant connection to the internet, even when playing single-player content. According to Perotti, Ubisoft PC games will now require "a one-time online activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline."
 
It’s nice to know publishers trust us again, though I wouldn’t be surprised if this was temporary. Hopefully, a little trust will go a long way, especially considering that absurd "93-95 percent piracy rate” Ubisoft likes to claim.


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