More Reviews
REVIEWS NBA LIVE 15 Review
Yes, NBA Live was horrible last year. But this year's entry is a vast improvement. Just give it a try.

Dungeon of the Endless Review
A roguelike that’s equal parts charming and challenging with a turn-based twist.
More Previews
PREVIEWS Resident Evil Revelations 2 Preview
Capcom returns to the episodic format that entertained us in the first game of the sub series published on Nintendo 3DS and followed with a console release. What will Claire and company uncover this time?
Release Dates
NEW RELEASES Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare
Release date: 11/04/14

Assassin's Creed Rogue
Release date: 11/11/14

Far Cry 4
Release date: 11/18/14

Dragon Age: Inquisition
Release date: 11/18/14


LATEST FEATURES Xbox Downloads October 2014 - Updating Each Week
Microsoft's Xbox One console continues an Xbox Live revolution started over a decade ago. Here's hoping Summer of Arcade makes it to the platform next year.

PlayStation Download October 2014 - Updating Each Week
Sony's PSN platform had new games each week along with free offerings for PlayStation Plus subscribers. Take a look at the weekly additions for October.

LEADERBOARD
Read More Member Blogs
FEATURED VOXPOP LinksOcarina This is another article from Blistered Thumbs I wrote, back from the dead after being buried in the way-back machine. I posted this back in April of 2013, and many of the issues present seem to be prevalent right now in some cases, namely the decrees of sexism and misogony. Considering current...

Recovery - Search & Rescue Review

Paul_Tamburro By:
Paul_Tamburro
01/15/14
PRINTER FRIENDLY VERSION
EMAIL TO A FRIEND
GENRE Action 
PLAYERS
PUBLISHER Excalibur 
DEVELOPER BigSims.com 
RELEASE DATE  

Lost and hopefully never found again.

This is it. This is the very worst game I have ever played.

There have been many bad games before Recovery: Search and Rescue. There was last year’s hugely derided Ride to Hell: Retribution, a game which was not only grossly incompetent, but wildly offensive too. However, at least Ride to Hell was laughably bad. It was the kind of game that you would not wish to purchase and play for yourself, but at least you could find some joy in watching a bemused YouTube commentator experience it in a Let’s Play.



On the other hand, Recovery: Search and Rescue is both achingly dull and barely functional, not even offering the thinnest sliver of entertainment to those unfortunate enough to have paid money for it. If Dead Silver's Ride to Hell was a slap in the face to consumers, then developer Excalibur Publishing’s Recovery: Search and Rescue is a kick to our groin using steel toe cap boots.

Recovery places you in the shoes of a ranger at the world’s most lifeless National Park who's tasked with embarking on a series of missions such as “Find a Child’s Red Cap” or “Find a Woman’s Pocket Watch." The Park is a barren wasteland, with only the occasional poorly animated wildlife popping up every now and again in amongst the foliage. While National Parks typically tend to be a vast sea of green and brown and little else, and thus not a very good setting for a videogame in the first place, Recovery’s sandbox setting is the blandest open world I have ever had the displeasure of exploring.


 
It’s often said that we don’t embrace the Great Outdoors enough, instead choosing to stay in and watch TV or play Call of Duty, and the populace of Recovery’s world is no different. Aside from the odd rescue mission in which you’re tasked with helping out a perfectly motionless man who has collapsed to the ground (yet is still inexplicably smiling), there is not a human to be found in this National Park, and for good reason. Who in their right minds would want to visit this dreary place, with its ugly scenery and distant mountains that have a habit of disappearing in front of your very eyes? In fact, if they ever make a Recovery: Search and Rescue 2, I hope it places me in control of a construction worker building a huge Walmart on top of this ugly shithole.

But Recovery’s aesthetics are the least of its problems. The game also pits you in the role of a dangerously unhealthy park ranger, equipped with an energy meter that steadily depletes even during the simple act of walking. As if the core gameplay wasn't tedious enough, with you doing literally nothing else other than traveling to red circles on the map to forage for a random item, carrying out these tasks while trapped within the body of a man who can’t even run for 10 yards without coming to a halt—thus causing you to fail your mission—is excruciating.
 
Though you can fill up your ranger’s energy meter by acquiring energy bars at the four huts located on the map by spending experience points, the problem is that the big experience points can only be earned by completing the lengthier missions, which your ranger won’t be able to travel to without running out of energy. As such, I found myself repeating the tutorial mission over and over again just to acquire the experience points in order to buy energy bars so that I could travel to some of the red circles located on the far end of the map. Oh, and did I mention that these red circles have a habit of not appearing, forcing you to abort the mission and start it over again?



However, even the awful execution of its intrinsically terrible concept is somehow not the worst part of Recovery. No, the worst part is that roughly every 10 seconds the screen will freeze for approximately 4 seconds, rendering the game virtually unplayable. Despite having a rig that can run most games on Very High to Ultra, I initially gave Recovery the benefit of the doubt and lowered all the graphics settings until the game was basically little more than a brown smudge on my PC monitor, and yet the frequent freezes persisted. These freezes then somehow become even more frequent when you hop onto the bike the game gives you to travel through its open-world.
 
Recovery: Search and Rescue has absolutely no redeeming qualities. It’s unfathomable to think that Excalibur Publishing believes that it is worth a solitary penny of the $15 it is currently being sold for on Steam, and that anyone who worked on it believed that they were creating anything other than a barely playable travesty. If 2014 sees the release of a more terrible game than this, I’ll eat every hat I own and hope I never recover.
 
Code provided by publisher. PC exclusive.
Recovery - Search & Rescue
emptyemptyemptyemptyempty
  • Inexplicably freezes every 10 seconds
  • A boring concept that's somehow worse than it sounds
  • Being the world's most unfit park ranger
  • Makes every other bad good look better by comparison
Reviews by other members
No member reviews for the game.


Tags:   PC, Indie, Steam

More from the Game Revolution Network




comments powered by Disqus

 


More information about Recovery - Search & Rescue
Also known as: Recovery - Search and Rescue


More On GameRevolution