Gearbox Hiring New Writer to Work on “Unannounced AAA FPS/RPG”, Most Likely Borderlands 3

Gearbox Software recently posted a new job listing on its site (via NeoGAF). The listing calls for a new writer to join the studio behind the Borderlands series to work on its next project. The listing describes the job as joining “the writing team for an unannounced AAA FPS/RPG hybrid with strong characters and central narrative thread.”

An FPS and RPG hybrid, huh? That sounds strangely like the series that Gearbox is best known for: Borderlands. Notably, the last game in the series developed by Gearbox Software- Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel – originally released in 2014 before coming to the current generation of consoles as part of Borderlands: The Handsome Collection along with Borderlands 2 in 2015.

Since then, there have been various reports, rumors, and hints that Gearbox is currently working on Borderlands 3. In fact, this isn’t the first time the studio has put out a call for prospective employees to join it, as the same was done back in 2015 with regards to a future Borderlands title.

Also: Gearbox Draws Controversy After G2A Partnership for Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition

Borderlands 3 is all but confirmed at this point, though, an official announcement of the title has yet to happen. No footage has been seen of the game thus far, outside of a tech demo that was released at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) earlier this year in San Francisco.

Gearbox

There, CEO of Gearbox Software Randy Pitchford presented a tech demo in Unreal Engine 4 that showed off the technology to give a glimpse of what Borderlands 3 will look like. The demo showed off a single desert environment and a character whose face wasn’t seen.

Though Borderlands 3 has yet to be officially announced, it is clear that Gearbox is hard at work on the next game in the series. The writer that it is currently hiring for will have the responsibilities of “writing dialogue for voice-over and in-game text for missions, flavor and user interfaces. A love for comedy writing with respect for a serious underlying plot is helpful.”